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Black Hill Regional Park Trails

Capital Region, Maryland

Family

Directions & Trail Description
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Location: Near Washington, D.C. in Germantown, MD. Montgomery County.

Length/Configuration: 4.3 mile Black Hill Trail is mostly asphalt. 10+ miles natural surface trails. Design your own out-and-back or loop rides.

Terrain/Surface: Black Hill Trail is paved. All other trails are natural surface.

Technical Difficulty: Mostly easy to moderate singletrack with possible small stream crossings and some short, steep climbs or descents.

Elevation change: Short, steep climbs for a total of a few hundred feet.

Caution: Some steep descents and drops. These trails are shared with hikers.

 

 

 

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Bike Wheel Image

Note: The free trail maps on this website have been simplified to provide an overview with approximate locations of trails and special features. Read Full Disclaimer.

Directions:

Take I-270 north from Washington D.C. to exit16, Rt. 27 east. Turn left on Rt. 355 , then left on Old Baltimore Rd. Turn left into the park. Drive to end and park in lot5. The paved hiker-biker trail starts near the restrooms.

 

General Description:

Black Hills Regional Park is a mix of oak and hickory forest and open space laced with numerous small streams in relatively narrow valleys. It surrounds the large, freshwater Little Seneca Lake, which is a popular bird breeding and habitation area.

The visitor center offers programs such as natural history education utilizing the lake and natural resources, nature films, conservation workshops, and interpretive exhibits. The park also hosts a variety of special events and programs including twilight concerts, summer stage, canoe and kayak classes. Other recreational facilities include: picnic pavillions, playground, volleyball court, hiking and biking trails. A popular escape from Washington D.C., the park gets crowded during nice summer weekends.

 

The Trails:

Black Hills is a good place for beginners to develop new skills. The bike trails at Black Hill Regional Park feature a paved 4.3 mile Black Hill Trail and over 10 miles of mostly single-track natural surface trails. The Black Hill Trail is an asphalt surface for most of its length, but the mid-section of the trail is natural surface and becomes steep and rocky in places. It connects the parking areas and provides access to the other dirt trails.

The singletrack dirt trails travel over varied terrain and offer spectacular views of Little Seneca Lake. They meander across small streams and through forest. In some areas of the park, these degenerate into grassy double-track. Riders will encounter rocks and exposed roots, creek crossings, muddy sections, some steep climbs and descents and a few rock hops. Along the way, plenty of birds can usually be seen from the trails and historical markers identify former mill sites and interpret past gold mining history.

The trails in the western end of the Black Hill Regional Park, where Ten Mile Creek empties into the lake, is far more rustic than the rest of the park. Grassy/dirt trails run along fields and the land surrounding the lake is wooded and hilly. A few fields cleared long ago are now growing new trees and sit 100 vertical ft. above the lake. The elevated fields offer some glimpses of the lake, however trees mostly obscure the view. This is the less used area of the park and in my book, that is a good thing.

 

For more information:

Montgomery Parks
MNCPPC
9500 Brunett Ave.
Silver Spring, MD 20901

Park Manager: (301) 972-9396
Visitor Center Phone: 301-972-3476
TTD Region 2: (301) 299-1976 Park Permit Office TDD: (301) 495-2575
Website: Black Hill Regional Park

 

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